April 26, 2010
The Mystery plant grows larger.  I still don’t know what it is and haven’t had the time to do a search. If anybody knows, I’d love to hear.
I’m smitten with it. I don’t see it anywhere else in the garden so I consider it a special gift.
































Behind the fence here the lilies have really gotten comfy.  They’re all cuddled up to the purple potato plant.  They’re definitely bullies though and have to be kept in line. They are almost completely dominating the foxgloves I planted here. Look at that one lone soldier in the left hand corner.
































Underneath the plum tree I’ve planted succulents culled from cuttings found here and there. They are unbelievably resilient and prolific once they get going.
I can’t stop loving that blue green and deep purple combination. It smells like heaven and if it tasted good that would just really send me over the edge.
And then there is lime green.


I know it’s a crazy noisy color, and I still love it, I can taste this color, it’s bitter and clean.



That bamboo hedge is filling in beautifully. I wonder when we will begin to find bamboo shoots throughout the rest of the yard.  Will it be a bamboo forest someday?  I sit out there sometimes and try to see the garden five or ten years from now, when the plum, maple and ginkgo trees have matured and fill the yard with dappled shade.





















Through the Lair screen, not a Photoshop 
filter.













It finally feels like we’ve got the major spring clean up done, all of the paths have been cleared of weeds.  Planting is mostly done too though I’ll have a few pockets to fill when I finally breakdown and pull out the flowering collard greens.  









More rain predicted this week! 
Advertisements

4 comments

  1. It “might” be: “Redstem Filaree” (E. cicutarium). An annual from the geranium family, the leafy stems are commonly from three to 12inches in length and the flowers, rose or lavender, are borne in small clusters at the ends of the stems. It says the stems & leaves are “hairy”—that may be the eliminating factor…
    P.S. It's nutritious food for cattle….
    Allene

    Like

  2. P.S. I love that word, “Filaree”. Makes me think of big skirts, with petticoats, twirling in a barn and cotton lace.
    A

    Like


I'm listening

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s